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Monthly Archive for March, 2011

David Cassuto Could this be you? NOTICE OF ASSISTANT DEAN POSITION AT PACE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK Pace University School of Law is seeking to fill one position, titled, Assistant Dean of Environmental Programs and Professor of Law for Designated Project or Service (Assistant Dean) for its nationally ranked Center for […]

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Law, Food, & Vegas

David Cassuto (x-post from Animal Blawg) Alas, blogging has paid a heavy price for what has been and continues to be a very busy semester.  But it’s been busy in a good way.  To wit, I am recently returned from both Las Vegas and Rio.  I’ll discuss Rio in my next post but first, to […]

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Uncooperative federalism?

by Karl Coplan The principle environmental regulatory programs in the United States work on a principle of cooperative federalism. Congress passes a regulatory statute such as the Clean Water Act; EPA adopts detailed regulations setting standards and implementing the program, and states have the option of taking over administration and permitting within each state, as […]

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by Richard Ottinger The recent nuclear catastrophe in Japan has focused intense (and well-deserved) scrutiny on the radioactive gorilla in our own backyard, the “safe/secure/vital” (as described by operator Entergy) Indian Point (nuclear) Energy Center in Buchanan, New York. More than 17 million people live within 50 miles of this plant. The greatest vulnerability of Entergy’s Indian Point, from […]

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by Sam Capasso, Student Guest Blogger currently at 40th Annual Conference on Environmental Law in Salt Lake City in Salt Lake City, UT ABA SEER’s three-day 40th Annual Conference on Environmental Law in Salt Lake City concluded this afternoon. David Hayes, Deputy Secretary of the Department of the Interior, set out what was arguably the […]

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by Karl Coplan As we watch with horror the events unfolding at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, it is clear that (as with the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill last year) we are witnessing not just an engineering failure, but a failure of a system of environmental regulation to anticipate and prevent these […]

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by John Nolon In its late February article, entitled “As They Ponder Reforms, Law Deans Find Schools Remarkably Resistant to Change,” the Chronicle of Higher Education reported that law faculty use the “lecture-based model because it is cost-effective and convenient,” quoting Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean of University of California’s Irvine School of Law. In the same […]

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by Karl Coplan The New York Times’ excellent series on the environmental issues associated with hydrofracking exposes a long-exploited loophole in the regulation of industrial wastes. As the Times article points out in the case of fracking fluids, these wastes are routinely dumped into publicly owned sewage treatment plants (POTWs). Since sewage treatment plants are […]

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