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Tag Archive 'climate change'

Land Use Climate Bubbles are emerging in every region of the country that should rivet the attention of policy makers. In numerous communities, property values are declining because of repeated flooding, continued threats of storm surges, sustained high temperatures, constant fear of wildfires, the lack of water in residential, commercial, and agricultural areas, and real […]

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On October 20th at Pace Law School, Professor John Nolon will demonstrate how local governments can preserve natural resources, maintain critical environmental functions, respond to climate change, and build sustainable communities. His presentation coincides with the launch of his new book on local environmental law, Preserving the Environment Through Land Use Law: Standing Ground, and his […]

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Professor Ann Powers from the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law Colloquium in Tarragona: Although an extensive range of energy topics are being covered, the Colloquium has focused primarily on terrestrial activities and has provided only limited discussion opportunities for those whose primary interests are the health and protection of our oceans and coastal waters.  The […]

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Submitted by John R. Nolon, Professor of Law, Pace Law School, Counsel to the Land Use Law Center, and Adjunct Professor of Land Use Law and Policy at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. In February, I posted a blog on Pace Law School’s GreenLaw site defining a land use climate change bubble. […]

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Land Use and the Climate Bubble

Real estate prices in many parts of the country are beginning to fall due to the real and perceived effects of climate change on land use. What is happening on the land is an indicator that a climate bubble is forming. The probability of it bursting is increasing — in some places at breakneck speed. […]

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The Fifth Assessment Report is out from the IPCC.  Andy Revkin’s DotEarth blog has an excellent summary.  No real surprises — the Earth has warmed, is warming, and will warm, the oceans are acidifying and human beings are in fact responsible for these changes due primarily to carbon emissions from fossil fuels. What is new […]

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Building technology and energy codes matured greatly during the last two decades making it possible for buildings, which consume 40 percent of the nation’s energy, to be net zero energy users, calling on government to translate technological advances into codes and to incentivize private owners to build and retrofit accordingly.  Local governments have the legal […]

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“Scientists Announce That Humanity Can Afford to Burn Twice as much Carbon as Previously Thought.”   File that thought among headlines-you-never-saw-in-the-New-York-Times.  But buried in Eduardo  Porter’s  Economics Scene column last month endorsing nuclear power as mitigation for global warming was just such a suggestion. Porter cites an “authoritative new study” for the proposition that  ”humanity […]

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Over the past two decades, some coherence in the federal environmental legal system has been achieved, but climate change now demands a stronger legal framework ensuring that federal, state, and local agencies work together to leverage available resources. Despite this imperative, recent legislation in North Carolina prohibiting the State Coastal Resources Commission from defining sea […]

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Open Space Law: Sequestration

The last two decades witnessed a surge in adopting local and state open space protection laws and strategies. These techniques are now being examined as capable of protecting and enhancing the sequestering environment, which captures and stores from 15 to 20 percent of the nation’s carbon dioxide emissions. This blog post is adapted from my […]

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